History of the Music Program: 2006-2007

First Parish Unitarian Universalist of Arlington

 

2006-2007
Director of Music: Laura Prichard
Organist: Wendy Covell

Sunday, September 3
Larry Osgood & Friends: "Music and Words as Acts of Compassion"

  • Musicians: Steve Carmody and Frank Toppa with Friends of Mystic Chorale
  • Presentation: Sue Streeter on Marshall B. Rosenberg's book Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life

Sunday, September 10
Rev. Dr. Barbara Whittaker-Johns and Carlton E. Smith: "Intergenerational Service of Ingathering and Water Communion"

  • Prelude: Au font du temple saint from Georges Bizet's Pearl Fishers
    Eric Sumner and Michael Prichard, vocalists
    Notes - The Prelude this morning is dedicated to our Senior Minister, Barbara Whittaker-Johns, on the occasion of her return to work, following a long medical leave of absence. We look forward to her thoughtful sermons and the renewed opportunity for fellowship this year! In this duet, Zurga (baritone) becomes chief of his people (in ancient Ceylon, now known as Sri Lanka). His long-lost best friend Nadir (tenor) returns, and they passionately, and musically, renew their vows of eternal friendship in this moving duet.
    Translation
    [NADIR] Au fond du temple saint - At the base of the holy temple
    Paré de fleurs et d'or, - Strewn with flowers and gold,
    Une femme apparaît! - A woman appears!
    Je crois la voir encore! - I believe I can still see her!
    La foule prosternée la regarde, etonnée, - The prostrate crowd looks at her, stunned,
    Et murmure tous bas: Voyez, c'est la déesse! - They murmur, "See it is the goddess!"
    Qui dans l'ombre se dresse - She who draws toward us in the shadow
    Et vers nous tend les bras! - And extends her arms!
    [ZURGA] Son voile se soulève! Ô vision! ô rêve! La foule est à genoux! Her veil is raised! O vision, O dream! The crowd is on their knees!
    [DUET] Oui, c'est elle! - Yes, it is she!
    C'est la déesse plus charmante et plus belle! - It is the charming and beautiful goddess!
    C'est la déesse qui descend parmi nous! - She comes down among us.
    Son voile se soulève et la foule est à genoux! - Her veil is raised and the crowd is on their knees!
    [ NADIR & ZURGA] The dialogue continues, discussing the return of the woman they both love and remember. They sing that they will never be separated again.
    [DUET] Jurons de rester amis! Oui, c'est elle! C'est la déesse!
    - We swear to remain friends! Yes, it is she! It is the goddess!
    En ce jour qui vient nous unir, - On this day which comes to unite us,
    Et fidèle à ma promesse, - And faithful to my promise,
    Comme un frère je veux te chérir! - As a brother I will cherish you!
    Qui vient en ce jour nous unir! - Who comes in this day to unite us,
    Oui, partageons le même sort, - Yes, let us share the same fate,
    Soyons unis jusqu'à la mort! - Together until death do us part!
  • Anthem: The Blue Bird by Charles V. Stanford (1852–1924)
    Jennifer Kobayashi, soprano solo
    Notes - Stanford was the son of Irish musicians and made his name in England as an improvisatory organist. He was a professor at both the Royal College of Music and at Cambridge University for over forty years, and was the main composition teacher of Edward Elgar, Gustav Holst, and Ralph Vaughan Williams. In The Blue Bird, Stanford uses a soprano solo to represent the female poet's voice. The choral parts mirror each other, symbolizing the bird's reflection on the surface of a calm lake. The altos sustain long pitches throughout the piece, representing the surface of the water and its ability to transform our perceptions of "real" images and their reflections (an opposite viewpoint, or a necessary balance?).
    Text by Mary Coleridge (1861-1907) -
    The lake lay blue below the hill,
    O'er it, as I looked, there flew
    Across the waters, cold and still,
    A bird whose wings were palest blue.
    The sky above was blue at last,
    The sky beneath me blue in blue,
    A moment, ere the bird had passed,
    It caught his image as he flew.
  • Water Music: Sicut cervus by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina
    Down in the River to Pray as featured in the film Oh Brother! Where Art Thou?
  • Singing: Keep Breathing led by Anne Goodwin
  • Offertory: Toccata in F by Dietrich Buxtehude
  • Postlude: Joyful, Joyful by Christina Harmon
    Wendy Covell, organ
  • Hymns & Readings: 209, 347, 416, 729, Down in the River to Pray, Deep River from Lift Every Voice and Sing II

Sunday, Sept. 17
"Be Not Afraid" Rev. Dr. Barbara Whittaker-Johns

  • Prelude: Brother James's Air by Harold Drake
  • Offertory: Lento by Johann S. Bach, arr. Jackson
  • Anthem: Gathered Safely In, original solo song by Diane Shriver
  • Postlude: Fugue in E-flat by Johann S. Bach
  • Hymns & Readings: 126, 368, 413, 447, 461

Sunday, Sept. 24
"Mother Ann's Closet - a Shaker Music Service" Nancy McDowell, Emily Browder, Andrew Leonard, and Jean Renard Ward

  • Prelude: Cantabile "O Sacred Head" by Flor Peeters
  • Offertory: Improvisation on the Shaker hymns "Work for the Harvest" and "Love, O Love" by Laura Prichard
  • Shaker Hymns and Songs: While Nature Lies; Welcome Here; Come Life, Shaker Life; Hop Up and Jump Up; I Love Mother; Lay Me Low; Hunger and Thirst; I Know How to Pray; Here Take This Lovely Flower; I Have a Little Drum; Am I Worthy; Summer Land; My Robe is New; Here's Love; The Humble Heart; Brave Soldier; Mother Anne's Closet; On Zion's Holy Ground; Work for the Harvest; O Lovely and Fair Mount Zion; Simple Gifts; I Am the True Vine; Funeral Hymn; Lucy Clark's Exaltation (O Heaven of Heavens); In Whose Service; Invitation to the River of Love; Brilliant Gem; Love, O Love; Come Love; Mother's Good Drink; Sittin' on a Seat; More Love; Just Enough Cross; All of Mother's Children; Oh, My Children; Willow Tree; I've Set My Face for Zion's Kingdom
  • Postlude: Finale from Jessica's Theme by Bruce Rowland
  • Hymns & Readings: 484, 16 (with Chalice Singers bellringers A. Friedman, M. Henriksen, and S. Fleishman)

Saturday,, Sept. 30, 3pm CONCERT and Sunday, Oct. 8, 3pm CONCERT (Amherst)
"Shaker Music Concert" The River of Love
Malcolm Halliday* and Laura Stanfield Prichard~, conductors
Soloists are listed below. Also joining us were twelve members of the Shrewsbury Youth Singers & Master Singers Youth Chorus, Malcolm Halliday, director. Other singers included: Lauren Cook, Grace Long, Allegra Martin, Carl Schlaikjer, and Jennifer Shaw

  • Shaker Spirituals Living Souls, Let's Be Marching (Tyringham, NY)
    A Mince Pie or a Pudding (Lebanon, NY) N. McDowell, E. Browder, Pamela Dellal, Andrew Leonard
    Invitation to the River of Love (NY) Robert Honeysucker
    Brilliant Gem (Anna White, Lebanon, NY) Nancy Annis McDowell
    I Love Mother Corinne Candilis
  • Four Harmonized Shaker Hymns~ The Spirit is Calling (Canterbury, NH)
    I'll Tell Thee of Heaven (Lebanon, NY)
    Work for the Harvest (Canaan, NY)
    Summer Land (Alfred, ME)
  • Simple Gifts (Joseph Brackett, Alfred ME) arranged by Aaron Copland (1944)
    Pamela Dellal and Bill Geha
  • From a Shaker Hymnal* (1999) by William Cutter
    I. There's a Light (Canterbury, NH)
    II. Let Zion Move (Alfred, ME)
    III. I Will Go On My Way (Enfield, NH)
    Bill Geha, piano
  • Shaker Hymns High on the Billows Alison Julian
    A Snag of It, or, a Handful of Gospel Love Nancy McDowell and the Children
    More Love (Canterbury, NH) Emily Browder
  • Throat Singing - a Demonstration by Eric Sumner
  • Shaker Spirituals used in Druckman's Cantata
    Come Life, Shaker Life (Issachar Bates, Lebanon, NY)
    Lucy Clarks' Exaltation (O, Heaven of Heavens) Emily Browder
    One, Two, Three Steps Nancy McDowell and Emily Browder
    I Have a Little Trumpet Nathan Reich
    Funeral Hymn (Our Father's Gone) Pamela Dellal
  • The Simple Gifts, a Cantata based on Themes of the American Shakers* (1954) by Jacob Druckman
    Bill Geha, piano; Emily Browder, Philip Candilis, Pamela Dellal, Andrew Leonard, soloists
  • Shaker Hymns I Beg and Pray (Eunice Wyeth, Harvard. MA)
    Jimmy Tyler, Michael Prichard, Monica O'Neil, Laura Prichard
    I Know How to Pray (James Whittaker, Enfield, NH) Philip Candilis
    I Hunger and Thirst (R. Mildred Barker, Sabbathday Lake, ME) Laura Prichard
    Mother Has Come with Her Beautiful Song (Paulina Springer, Alfred, ME) James Frens
  • Shaker Spirituals used in Sawyer's Cantata
    The Humble Heart (Thomas Hammond, Harvard, MA) Pamela Dellal
    Lay Me Low (Addah Z. Potter, Lebanon, NY) Nancy McDowell
    Dismission of the Devil Robert Honeysucker
    Drink Ye of Mother's Wine (South Union, KY) Andrew Leonard
    Mother Ann's Song (Anne Lee, Lebanon, NY) Michael Prichard
  • The Humble Heart* (commissioned by New England Voices, 2006) by Eric Sawyer
    Lydia Sawyer and Katie O'Connor, Karen Oosterban, Tomas Fajaro, violins; Bill Geha, piano
    Emily Browder, Robert Honeysucker, Pamela Dellal, Andrew Leonard, soloists
  • Shaker Spirituals On Zion's Holy Ground Diane Taraz Shriver
    In My Father's House (Lebanon, NY)
    I Will Bow and Be Simple (Mary Hazard, Lebanon, NY)
    I've Set My Face for Zion's Kingdom (Betsy Spaulding, Pleasant Hill, KY)
  • Review/Announcement: 'River of Love' a celebration of Shaker music (from the Springfield Examiner, Friday, October 06, 2006) by Clifton J. Noble, Jr., Music writer
    Thanks to composer Aaron Copland's inclusion of it in his ballet "Appalachian Spring," the beloved tune "Simple Gifts" represents the extent of most concertgoers' knowledge of American Shaker music. For music lovers eager to enrich their experience of this humble, intensely spiritual singing tradition, Music on Main's presentation of the New England Voices program "The River of Love" Sunday at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church in Amherst offers a signal opportunity to do so.The Arlington-based New England Voices is conducted by Malcolm Halliday. The concert includes chamber chorus, children's chorus and instrumentalists, and a string quartet. Vocal soloists include soprano Emily Browder, mezzo-soprano Pamela Dellal, tenor Andrew Leonard, and baritone Robert Honeysucker. Pianist Eda Mazo-Shlyam is also featured.
    Of local interest is the Western Massachusetts premiere of a new work crafted around Shaker themes by Amherst College professor Eric Sawyer, called "The Humble Heart." Sawyer describes the piece as a cantata based on traditional texts from the American Shakers, centering on community rites of humility and mystical experience. He scores parts of the work for children, both singing and playing instruments, to highlight the role of children in Shaker communities as well as to echo the attitude of simplicity and playfulness present in many of his chosen texts.Sawyer described the program (performed in Arlington on Sept. 30) as "a very special concert, offering a portrait of Shaker musical tradition you're unlikely to hear anywhere else. The performers include some of Boston's leading singers singing both solo and in chorus with children - a representation of Shaker inclusiveness."
    In addition to Sawyer's composition, organizer Nancy McDowell discovered an unknown cantata by the late Jacob Druckman to flesh out the modern response to Shaker music. Combining the 20th and 21st century sound-worlds with the early-American traditional forms and harmonic constructions makes for a unique listening experience.

Sunday, Oct. 1
"Forgiveness, Mechilah, and Yom Kippur" Rev. Dr. Barbara Whittaker-Johns with the Jewish Connections Group
HEBREW MUSIC SUNDAY with guest harpist, Virginia Crumb

  • Prelude: And the Heavens Were Created by Arthur Einstein
  • Candle Blessing: sung by Bonnie Zimmer
  • Sounding of the Shofar: Dorothy May, shofar
  • Candle Music - Congregation: Mi Shebeirach by Debbie Friedman
    Jewish tradition ordains that whenever the Torah is read we are granted a special and uniquely opportune moment to invoke blessing for those in need of divine intervention. From time immemorial it has therefore been the custom to recite a Mi Shebeirach(prayer for the sick) on behalf of people who are ill.
    Mi shebeirach avoteinu  (The one who has blessed our fathers)
    M 'kor habracha l'imoteinu.  (Source of blessing for our mothers.)
    May the source of strength who blessed the ones before us,
    Help us find the courage to make our lives a blessing, and let us say, Amen.
    Mi shebeirach imoteinu  (The one who has blessed our mothers)
    M 'kor habracha l'avoteinu.  (Source of the blessing for our fathers)
    Bless those in need of healing with r'fuah sh'leimah.  (complete healing)
    The renewal of body, the renewal of spirit, and let us say, Amen.
  • Candle Music - Choir: We Remember Them by Ben Steinberg
  • Offertory: For the New Year by Herman Berlinski
  • Anthem: Adonai, lo gavah libi (Lord, my heart is not haughty, Psalm 131) from Leonard Bernstein's Chichester Psalms
    Virginia Crumb, harp
  • Sung Benediction: Shalom Rav by Ben Steinberg
    Dorothy May, cantor; Virginia Crumb, harp
  • Postlude: Song of the Birds by Pablo Casals
  • Hymns & Readings: 399, 413, 633, 634, Avinu Malkeinu

Friday, October 6
"Raising New Orleans" or "Sweeping Away Illusions" by Cheri Minton, the John, Carolyn, and Coletta Hodges
Alliance Program with First Parish Choir selected from the following:

  • Ubi caritas, op. 10, no. 1 (1960) by Maurice Duruflé
  • You are the New Day by Peter Knight
  • That Lonesome Road by James Taylor
  • Down in the River to Pray from the Coen Brothers' film, based on Homer's Odyssey, Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?

Sunday, October 8
Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith and Sally Patton: "God Makes No Mistakes: Creating Beloved Community for All Our Children" by Sally Patton

  • Prelude: Berceuse by Ralph Kinder
  • Candle Music: Wanting Memoriesby Ysaye M. Barnwell (of Sweet Honey in the Rock)
    I am sitting here wanting memories to teach me,
    to see the beauty in the world through my own eyes.
    I thought that you were gone, but now I know you're with me;
    you are the voice that whispers all I need to hear.
    You used to rock me in the cradle of your arms,
    you said you'd hold me 'til the pains of life were gone.
    You said you'd comfort me in times like these
    and now I need you, and now I need you, and you are gone.
    Now the world outside is such a cold and bitter place,
    here inside I have few things that will console,
    And when I try to hear your voice above the storms of life
    then I remember all the things that I was told.
    I think on the things that made me feel so wonderful when I was young,
    the things that made me laugh, made me dance, made me sing.
    I think on the things that made me grow into a being full of pride;
    think on these things, for they are truth.
    I know a "please", a "thank you", and a smile will take me far;
    I know that I am you and you are me and we are one,
    I know that who I am is numbered in each grain of sand;
    I know that I've been blessed again and over again.
    Notes - Unitarian Universalist Ysaye M. Barnwell joined the all-female a cappella group Sweet Honey In The Rock in 1979. The concept and leadership of the group rest primarily with Bernice Johnson Reagon, who, as vocal director of the D.C. Black Repertory Theater, founded The Sweet Honey in 1973. Reagon began her work as a socially conscious artist in 1961 during the Albany, Georgia Civil Rights Movement campaign. Combining the full gamut of the African-American vocal tradition, Sweet Honey's repertoire incorporates original West African songs that were brought by slaves to the Americas, work songs, congregational spirituals, full-on gospel numbers, blues, jazz, freedom songs from the Civil Rights movement, love songs and modern rap.The current five members come from a variety of backgrounds with Reagon's scholarly credentials including her current appointment as Curator Emerita at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History in Washington DC. She received a Presidential Medal in 1995 for her contribution to the humanities (including work on the PBS series Eyes on the Prize) and is the author of several books on African-American History. The group's name came from their first song, a parable that told of a land so rich that when the rocks were cracked open, honey flowed.
    Ysaye M. Barnwell (pronounced Eaze-eye) joined the group in 1979 and along with Reagon has become the group's main spokeswoman. Barnwell holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Speech Pathology and a Ph.D. in Public Health. She has worked on various projects as a composer (Sesame Street, the Dance Company of Pittsburgh, the Women's Philharmonic of San Francisco), has taught at Howard University, and has presented her workshop Singing In The African-American Traditionall around the world. This workshop in part-singing has been recorded, and we highly recommend it!
  • Offertory: Interlude by Charles Tournemire
  • Anthem: You are the New Dayby John David (of the British band Airwaves, 1978), arranged by Peter Knight
    I will love you more than me and more than yesterday,
    if you can but prove to me you are the new day.
    Send the sun in time for dawn,
    let the birds all hail the morning;
    love of life will urge me say,
    "You are the new day."
    When I lay me down at night knowing we must pay,
    thoughts occur that this night might stay yesterday.
    Thoughts that we, as humans small,
    could slow worlds and end it all
    lie around me where they fall, before the new day.
    One more day when time is running out for everyone;
    like a breath I knew would come
    I reach for the new day.
    Hope is my philosophy,
    just needs days in which to be,
    love of life means hope for me
    borne on a new day.
    Notes - Songwriter and record producer John David was born in 1946 in Cardiff, Wales. Having played bass on popular hits with Dave Edmunds in the group Love Sculpture (Sabre Dance, 1969; I Hear You Knocking, 1970; and It's Too Late in 1970 covered by The Searchers), John has had several parallel careers; as a session bass player, solo performer, producer, songwriter and a member of the Rockfield studio band Airwaves which chalked up two Top-100 albums. John has gone on to produce some of the biggest names in rock at his Berry Hill studio, including Robert Plant, the BBC, Cliff Richard, and Little Richard. As a bassist, John has performed with Springsteen, Clapton, Sting, Bryan Adams, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr.
  • Postlude: Children's March by Franz Schubert
    Frank Toppa, piano
  • Hymns & Readings: 338, 413, 596, How Could Anyone, excerpt from Radical Hospitality, Benedict's Way of Love by Father Daniel Homan and Lonni Collins Pratt, What's Really Worth Doing and How to Do It by Judith Snow

Sunday, October 15
Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith: "When Bigger is Better"

  • Prelude: Autumn by Antonio Vivaldi
  • Candle Music - Anthem: Silent Meditation from Ernest Bloch's Avodath Hakodesh (Sacred Service, 1933)
    Ernest Bloch was a Swiss-born, American-Jewish composer born 125 years ago. This third movement of Bloch's Sacred Service starts with a meditation. The orchestra/organ alone is heard, allowing the listeners a moment to formulate their own thoughts in silent prayer. Then the choir, a cappella, quietly intones Yihyu Lerotson, the prayer for acceptance. The composer called this section "a silent meditation which comes in before you take your soul out and look at what it contains." The most important part of any Jewish prayer is the introspection it provides, the moment that we spend looking inside ourselves, seeing our role in the universe.
    Translation
    - O Lord, may the words of my mouth and the meditations of my heart
    be acceptable before Thee, Adonoi, my Rock and Redeemer. Amen (So be it).
    [Side thought on the word Adonai] - Adonai comes from the root word "Adon," which means lord. A king would be referred to as Lord, or actually any person of high status. In modern Israel, Adon is used as "mister", as in Adon Bloch = Mr. Bloch. A related word, Adoni (pronounced adonee), means "my lord," and is used as a form of respect. Adonai means Lord in the divine sense (as in this prayer): this is what confused the gospel writers, who didn't know Hebrew, and thus didn't know that Jesus was being referred to as Adoni, because he was a teacher.
  • Offertory: Choral from Suite Gothique by L. Boellmann
  • Anthem: Followers of the Lamb (1847 Shaker melody from New Lebanon, NY) arranged by Philip R. Dietterich
    Philip R. Dietterich (b. 1931) was born into a musical family in Buffalo, New York, and now lives in retirement in Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts. He is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University, The Boston University School of Theology, and Union Theological Seminary, New York City. For many years, he was the full time Minister of Music at First United Methodist Church in Westfield, New Jersey. He was the founding director of the Oratorio Singers (Westfield, NJ) from 1980-94, and in the late 1990s, he created a noontime concert series at the Whaling Church in Edgartown, MA that spearheaded the restoration campaign for its historic organ. A widely published composer of church music, his 1977 Followers of the Lamb is a spirited arrangement of the 1847 Shaker text and tune by Clarissa Jacobs (Lebanon, NY).
  • Postlude: A Mighty Fortress by M. Praetorius
  • Hymns & Readings: 28, 413, 529, Blue Boat Home, excerpt from the sermon People Ask About God by Rev. A. Powell Davies, D. d. (All Soul's Unitarian Church, January 13, 1957)

Sunday, October 22
Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith and Dr. Charlie Clements: "Ordinary Heroes" [The Legacy of the Rev. Waitstill and Martha Sharp, founders of the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee]

  • Prelude: Jazz Waltz for Organ by Dmitri Shostakovich
  • Candle Music: Beati quorum via, op. 38, no. 3by Charles V. Stanford (1852–1924)
    Translation - Blessed are those who act with integrity, who walk according to the way of the Lord.Psalm 119: 1

    Notes - Stanford was the son of Irish musicians and made his name in England as an improvisatory organist. His three Latin motets were composed in 1905 during his first years in Cambridge. He began as the Organ Scholar of Queen's College, but by the time he was just twenty he was in the employ of Trinity, where he revolutionized the music-making of the college. Stanford also studied in Leipzig and Berlin; he became a professor at both the Royal College of Music and at Cambridge University for over forty years, was the main composition teacher of Edward Elgar and Ralph Vaughan Williams, and is buried in Westminster Abbey next to composer Henry Purcell. Beati quorum via, set in a rich six-part SSATBB, clearly pays homage to Brahms with its flowing lines, lingering suspensions and rich harmonic language.

  • Offertory: Romanza by Ralph Vaughan Williams
  • Anthem: Avinu malkeinu from the Sacred Service by Max Janowski
    Michael Prichard, cantor
    Translation - Hear our voice, O father, pity and be compassionate to us, and accept, with compassion and favour, our prayers.
    Traditional prayer for Yom Kippur
    Notes - Max Janowski (1912-1991) was born in Berlin, Germany. He was a prodigious 20th-century composer, conductor, and organist whose liturgical compositions have been performed in concert halls, synagogues, churches and colleges throughout the world. He emigrated to Japan and then to New York in 1937. He was the beloved music director, organist, and choir director at six Chicago-area synagogues and Unitarian congregations.
  • Postlude: Adagio by Louis Vierne
  • Hymns & Readings: 221, 346, 413, 722, On the 'slow genocide' in Sudan by Elie Wiesel

Sunday, October 29
Rev. Barbara Whittaker-Johns: "To Hallow Creation"

  • Prelude: Requiem by Charles Villiers Stanford
  • Costume Parade: Organ music played by Wendy Covell
  • Offertory: Excerpts from Fantasia (The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Dance of the Hours, Night on Bald Mountain)
    First Parish Symphonic Band
  • Anthem: The Circle of Life from The Lion King by Elton John and Lebo M
    Chalice Singers and Adult Choir with Alex Ptacek-Zimmer, congas
  • Postlude: Organ
  • Hymns & Readings: 52 and 21 (with Chalice Sparks and Chalice Singers on bells), 369, Leaves Don't Fall from Kol Haneshamah, How the Bat Came to Be, It is up to us to hallow creation by Rabbi Rami Shapiro

Wednesday, November 1
Memorial Service: "Remembering the Life of Christopher Cirker, 1949-2006"

  • Prelude: Deep River played by Jim Austin, piano
  • Musical Interlude: Chelsea Bridge by Billy Strayhorn played by the First Parish Jazz Band
  • Musical Interlude: With Drooping Wings Ye Cupids Come, Memorial Chorus from Dido and Aeaneas by Henry Purcell played by Laura Prichard on Chris' alto saxophone
  • Musical Interlude: Song for My Father by Horace Silver played by the First Parish Jazz Band
  • Musical Interlude: played by Leah Cirker-Stark
  • Postlude: The Gift of Love played by Jim Austin, piano
  • Hymns & Readings: excerpts from Psalm 139, Kaddish by Marcy Piercy

Sunday, November 5 Requiem Sunday with orchestra
Click here for Mozart Practice files
Rev. Barbara Whittaker-Johns: "A Spiritual Framework for the Left, or, How the Progressives Can Cure their Hypercognition"

  • Prelude: Adagio by Wolfgang A. Mozart
  • Child Dedication Music: Silver the Moon by Diane Taraz Shriver
    Diane Taraz Shriver, voice and guitar
  • Candle Music-Offertory: Recordare from Mozart's Requiem
  • Anthem: Dies irae from Mozart's Requiem
  • Postlude: Confutatis and Lacrymosa from Mozart's Requiem
  • Hymns & Readings: 115, 384, 413, 464, 714

Sunday, November 12
Carlton E. Smith assisting Rev. John Hickey, Senior Minister and Executive Director of UU Urban Ministry

  • Prelude: Prayer by Eduardo Torres
  • Candle Music: Planxty Fanny Power by Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738)
    Sir Roger de Coverly
    (18th-century English folk dance)
    Both arranged for violin and viola by Julie Waters
    David Whitford, violin; Emma Whitford, viola; Drew Pereli, cello
  • Offertory: Excerpt from The Light in the Wilderness by Dave Brubeck
  • Anthem: Imagine by John Lennon
  • Postlude: Organ
  • Hymns & Readings: 123, 146, 360, 413, excerpt from Walking in the Wind by John Lewis

Sunday, November 19 A Cappella Day at First Parish
Guest Musicians Whim 'n' Rhythm of Yale University
Rev. Barbara Whittaker-Johns: "Can the Journey Be Taken All Alone?"

  • Prelude: Trumpet Tune by Ray Brunner
  • Children's Choirs Anthem: Rock-a My Soul - traditional spiritual
  • New Member Recognition: Vision of Love (1990) by Mariah Carey (Whim)
  • Candle Music: The Hammond Song (1979) by Margaret A. Roche of the Roche Sisters (Whim & Whim Alumni)
  • Offertory: Galileo (1992) by Emily Saliers of the Indigo Girls (Whim)
  • Anthem: We Are (1991) by Ysaye M. Barnwell (Whim & First Parish Choir)
  • Postlude: This Little Light of Mine by Calvin Taylor
  • Hymns & Readings: 40, 42, 374, 530

Sunday, November 26
Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith and Awinja Otiato: "Welcome to Kenya" ["Karibu Kenya" in Kiswahili]

  • Prelude: Come, Ye Thankful People, Come by F. Cunningham Woods
  • Candle Music: The Pollen Path by Diane Shriver
    The First Parish UUlations, led by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Offertory: Thanks Be to Thee by George F. Handel
  • Anthem: Breaths by Ysaye M. Barnwell
    The First Parish UUlations, led by Jennifer Kobayashi
  • Postlude: Allegretto by D. Zipoli
  • Hymns & Readings: 390, 614

Saturday, December 2 First Parish Youth Group Fundraising Concert
The youth group is planning a service trip to New Orleans in February 2006 and will be holding a concert to raise money for their trip. The concert will feature Arlington Feed & Grain, Spare Change (a high school band), and other bands. The Youth Group will sell refreshments. Anyone interested in performing for the Dec. 2 event is asked to contact Lindsay Southwick at (781) 646-5240.

Sunday, December 3
Rev. Barbara Whittaker-Johns: "Who is Born, Who Lives, Who Dies?"

  • Prelude: Gotteszeit ist die allerbeste Zeit by Johann S. Bach
  • Candle Music: Beati quorum via by Charles V. Stanford
  • Offertory: Berceuse by Manuel de Falla
  • Anthem: Geistliches Wiegenlied by Johannes Brahms
    Dorothy May, alto; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Wendy Covell, piano
  • Postlude: Behold, a Rose is Blooming by Johannes Brahms
  • Hymns & Readings: 12, 126, 413, 534

Sunday, December 3, 3pm
Cantilena Women's Chorale, conducted by Kenneth Seitz

Sunday, December 10 Winter Music Service

  • Prelude: Good Swing Wenceslas by Sammy Nestico (for the Boston Pops)
  • Candle Music: Organ
  • Offertory: In Eccelsiisby Giovanni Gabrieli

    Click here for an article on the piece and on Venetian music.

    Brass choir: Brad Amidon, Peter Pulsifer, trumpets; Michelle Markus, clarinet; Chris Botos, Andrew Leonard, trombones; Mark Seibring, tuba
    Tenor and Soprano Duet: Andrew Leonard and Jennifer Kobayashi
    Tenor and Baritone Duet: Chris Jones and Jean Renard Ward


  • Anthem: Daniel Pinkham Christmas Cantata with brass (in memoriam 2006)
    I. Quem vidistis, pastores, dicite, annunciate nobis, in terris quis apparuit?
    Whom did you see, shepherds, tell us, proclaim to us: who has appeared on the earth?
    Natum vidimus et choros angelorum collaudantes Domino.
    We saw the newborn child and choirs of angels praising the Lord.
    II. O magnum mysterium et admirabile sacramentum,
    O great mystery and admirable sacrament,
    ut animalia viderent Dominum natum, jacentem in præsepio. Alleluia!
    that animals should see the newborn Lord lying in their manger. Rejoice!
    III. Gloria in excelsis Deo et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis.
    Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace to people of goodwill.


    Daniel Pinkham, born 1923, was a graduate of Harvard and studied under a distinguished roster of composers that included Walter Piston, Aaron Copland, Artur Honegger, Samuel Barber, and Nadia Boulanger. His mastery of the keyboard owed much to his studies with Wanda Landowska on the harpsichord and E. Power Biggs on the organ. He was appointed director of the King's Chapel, Boston, a position he held until 2000; concurrently he also served as a member of the faculty of the New England Conservatory of Music. 

    His Christmas Cantata, subtitled Sinfonia Sacra, a 20th century homage to the Baroque, recalls the brilliance of the Venetian school of chorus-and-brass music, particularly as embodied in the works of Giovanni Gabrieli. The Cantata is cast in the form of three contrasting short movements and is scored for chorus and double brass choir. The first movement, "Quem vidistis?" ("Whom did you see, shepherds?"), relates how the shepherds learned of the newborn Christ child. The text is drawn from the antiphon verses sung at Christmas Midnight Mass. The second movement, "O magnum mysterium" ("Oh great mystery"), tells how the animals in the stable observed Christ's birth, further extolling the mystery of the virgin birth. This text is drawn from one of the responses sung in monasteries at matins, or daybreak, on Christmas day. The final movement, "Gloria in excelsis Deo" ("Glory to God in the highest"), a hymn of praise which the angels sing, is derived in part from a passage in the gospel of Luke. It is sung or recited as part of the Proper of the High Mass. Pinkham's setting is particularly felicitous in its alteration of energetic brass sections with a cappella choral passages.

    • Postlude: Wondrous Love by Daniel Pinkham
    • Hymns & Readings: Good King Wenceslas
  • Monday, December 11 Alliance Holiday Party

    • Introduction: Let Christmas Come
      Cheri Minton, voice; Lorraine Cooley, piano
    • Intergenertional Caroling: 227, 235, 251, Santa Claus is Coming to Town, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Silver Bells
    • Chalice Singers: 'Twas the Night Before Christmas
      Here in My House There Are Candles Burning Bright
    • All Children's Choirs: O Hannukah, Rock-a My Soul, Holiday Singalong (Silver Bells, etc.)
    • First Parish Flute Loops: Ave verum corpus by Wolfgang A. Mozart
      Coventry Carol arranged by John Ciaglia for the Middlesex County Volunteers Fife & Drum Corps
      Led by Mies Boet-Whitaker
    • First Parish Intergenerational Orchestra: Excerpts from J. S. Bach's Toccata and Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker
    • First Parish Intergenerational Klezmer Band: Tchiribim and Hava Nagila
    • UUlations: Lo, How a Rose (canon) by Melchior Vulpius (c1560-1615), arranged by Jennifer Kobayashi
      Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella (French carol) arranged by Clifton J. Noble Jr. (1961-), staff accompanist for Smith College

    Sunday, December 17
    "Winter Light: an Intergenerational Celebration of Holidays"

    • Prelude: Break Forth, O Beauteous Heavenly Light (Bach); O Morning Star (Bach); Personet Hodie
      First Parish Brass - Brad Amidon, trumpet; Chris Botos and Andrew Leonard, trombones; Mark Seibring, tuba
    • Chalice Lighting Song:The Christians and the Pagans by Dar Williams
      First Parish Teens' Group with Drew Pereli and Alan Schweitzer, guitars
    • Children's Choirs: O Hannukah
    • Solstice Music: Long Sword Dance
      Rapper Dancers & the Lord/Lady of Misrule (Andy & Jennifer Kobayashi)
    • Christmas Anthems: Lo, How a Rose
      Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella
      arrnged by Clifton J. Noble
      sung by the UUlations, directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
    • Added Solo Anthem: Ave Maria by Franz Schubert
      Nancy MacDowell, soprano; Wendy Covell, piano
    • Postlude: Organ
    • Hymns & Readings: 124, 235 (with Chalice Singers on bells), 542, Nine Spoons by Marci Stillerman, Hannukah Lights, One Small Face by Margaret Starkey, Meditation for the Advent Season by Bernadette Murphy, Karibu Kwanzaa, We Are Pulling Together, The Nguzo Saba (Seven Principles for Seven Candles)
    Friday, December 22 Winter Solstice
    • The Christians and the Pagans by Dar Williams
      Coletta Hodges and Eva Cirker-Stark, songleaders
    • Hymns & Readings: 226, 235

    Sunday, December 24
    Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith: Christmas Eve Morning

    • Prelude: Interlude by Herbert Fromm
    • Intergen. Music: Hark, How the Bells adapted in 1936 by Peter Wilhousky (1902-1978) from a 1916 Ukrainian song by Mykola Leontovich (1877-1921)
      Click here to hear a keyboard play all the parts (SATB)
    • Offertory: Three excerpts from Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker Ballet
      First Parish Symphonic Band
    • Anthem: Geistliches Wiegenlied by Johannes Brahms
      Dorothy May, alto; Drew Pereli, cello; Wendy Covell, piano
    • Postlude: Lo, How a Rose E'er Blooming by James Woodman
    • Hymns & Readings:231, 237, 240, 241, 616, Amazing Peace by Maya Angelou

    Sunday, December 24, 5pm
    Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith: Christmas Eve Service

    • Instrumental Prelude: Wendy Covell and guest soloists
      At Christmas-tide by Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)
      Krista Ernewein, soprano; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Mies Boet Whitaker, flute
      Daniel Rueters-Ward and Jean Renard Ward, tenors
    • Anthem: Videntes stellam by Francis Poulenc (1899-1963)
      Click here to hear this selection by individual part
    • Musical Response (following second reading): Dedicated to the memory of Daniel Pinkham
      Gloria in excelsis
      from the Christmas Cantata of Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006)
      Click here to hear a keyboard play all the parts (SATB)
    • Special Offering for Renewal House: Variations on Es kommt ein Schiff geladen by Harald Rohlig
    • Hymns & Readings: 47, 244, 245, 246, 251, 253, Luke 2:1-18, Matthew 2: 1-23
    • Recessional: Here We Come a-Wassailing
    • Postlude: I Saw Three Ships by John Duro

    Sunday, December 31
    Guest Speaker: Rebecca Benefiel Bijur, Harvard Divinity School "Just in Time"
    with Carlton Elliott Smith "How Do You Tell Time?"

    • Prelude: Sleeping Beauty's Pavane from Maurice Ravel's Mother Goose Suite
      Laura Prichard, piano
    • Offertory: Music by Improvelocity
    • Anthem: Seasons of Love by Jonathan Larsen from Rent
      Dora Pereli and Annie Whitford, vocalists; Meg Candilore, piano
    • Improvisation: Music by Improvelocity
    • Postlude: Largo from Dvorák's New World Symphony
    • Hymns & Readings: 22, 108, 413, 544, 1009, Ecclesiastes 3: 1-13

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    Saturday, January 6, 5pm
    Memorial Service for Bill Orme-Johnson (1938-2007)

    • Prelude: Arlington Feed & Grain
    • Song: Duet performed by Maggie and Ruth Orme-Johnson
    • Song: We Remember Them by Ben Steinberg
    • Remembrances: Dolly and David Orme-Johnson
    • Song: That Lonesome Road by James Taylor
    • Postlude: Arlington Feed & Grain
    • Hymns & Readings 401, 649, 660, 720, Blowin' in the Wind by Bob Dylan

    Sunday, January 7
    Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith: "The Art of Leadership"

    • Prelude: The Awakening by François Couperin (1668-1733)

      François Couperin was an esteemed French Baroque composer, organist and harpsichordist. In 1693 Couperin became organiste du Roi at the Chapelle Royale for Louis XIV, and in 1717 was promoted to ordinaire de la musique de la chambre du Roi. His most famous book, L'Art de toucher le clavecin ("The Art of Harpsichord Playing", published in 1716), contained suggestions for fingerings, touch, ornamentation and other features of keyboard technique. It influenced J.S. Bach, who adopted his fingering system, including the use of the thumb. Many of François Couperin's keyboard pieces have evocative, picturesque titles and express a mood through key choices, adventurous harmonies and (resolved) discords. They have been likened to miniature tone poems. These features attracted Richard Strauss, who orchestrated some of them. As the early-music expert Jordi Savall has pointed out, Couperin was the "poet musician par excellence." He believed in "the ability of Music (with a capital M) to express itself in sa prose et ses vers " (prose and poetry). He believed that if we enter into the poetry of music, we discover that it is "plus belle encore que la beauté" (more beautiful than beauty itself).

    • Candle Music: Velvet Shoes (1927) by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
      Sung by the First Parish Choir Women and the Chalice Singers
      Click hereto practice this selection with the melody emphasized

      Randall Thompson was an American composer. He attended Harvard University, became assistant professor of music and choir director at Wellesley College, and received a doctorate in music from the University of Rochester School of Music. He went on to teach at the Curtis Institute of Music, at the University of Virginia, and at Harvard, where Leonard Bernstein was one of his students. He is particularly noted for his choral works. His most popular and recognizable choral work is his anthem, Alleluia, commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky for the opening of the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood.

    • Offertory: Celebration for Tranquility (1998) by Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006)
      The second of four Celebrations for solo organ, this work was commissioned for the large four-manual organ of the First Unitarian Society of Newton.
    • Anthem: Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening (1957) by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
      Sung by the First Parish Choir Men (with 8 handbells)

      Click here to hear Robert Frost read his poem
      Click here to read about the composition and to hear an expressive a cappella recording by the Two-by-Fours (last link on the page).

    • Postlude: Moon Lullaby (1955) from Mountain Idylls, op. 155 by Alan Hovhaness (1911-2000)
      Hovhaness was an American composer of Armenian and Scottish descent who grew up at 5 Blossom Street in the Pierce School neighborhood of Arlington. His music is accessible to the lay listener and often evokes a mood of mystery or contemplation. He was among the most prolific composers of the twentieth century, composing 67 symphonies and more than 400 published works. He composed two operas during his teenage years which were performed at Arlington High School, and the composer Roger Sessions took an interest in his music during this time. Moon Lullaby was composed in 1955, the highpoint of his compositional career, when his Symphony No. 2, Mysterious Mountain, was premiered by Leopold Stokowski in his debut with the Houston Symphony.
    • Hymns & Readings: 90, 300, 413, 598
    • Notes on the Choral Music: The three-stanza text Velvet Shoes by New Jersey poet Elinor Wylie (1885-1928) evokes the beautiful tranquility of a walk in the snow. "Under veils of white lace, we shall walk in velvet shoes: Wherever we go, silence will fall like dews on the white silence below..." Wylie was famous during her life almost as much for her ethereal beauty and personality as for her melodious, sensuous poetry. This poem comes from her first mature poetry collection, Nets to Catch the Wind (1921). As we listen to this poem, our senses are arrested by whiteness, silence, suspended motion, and softness. These sensual ideas fuse together to create a response called synesthesia. Wylie's snow symbolizes tranquility, just as the speaker in Frost's "Stopping by Woods" listens to "the sweep / Of easy wind and downy flake" and observes that "The woods are lovely, dark, and deep." In fact, Frost's scene, with its "frozen lake" nearby, is actually colder, and may suggest a very subtly pervading presence of death. But there is no such sense of winter's coldness in Velvet Shoes. The lace and silk, the milk, dews, silence, peace, and velvet are all tranquil and comforting.

      Snow is often used in Zen poetry to suggest the true nature of the world when finally perceived by the enlightened awareness. Everything is seen as one, the same, radiant, "white" -- everything comes to rest in the interpenetrating glow of being. The idea of separation is lost in the light of a fluid continuity. Objects may not be passively disappearing, but actively hiding themselves. American poet Ivan M. Granger compared this to the Zen approach to worship: "recognizing your own bright nature in the midst of the still, bright field of being -- and to let the sense of a separate (selfish) self fade as you gently merge into that radiance of interbeing."

      Worship by Dogen (1200-1253)
      A white heron
      Hiding itself
      In the snowy field,
      Where even the winter grass
      Cannot be seen.

      In The Snow Man, American poet Wallace Stevens works with the Zen concept of emptiness, or at least three of the four Noble Truths: a) life is suffering; b) suffering results from attachment to transient things and ideas; and c) a cessation of suffering is attainable.)

      The Snow Man by Wallace Stevens (1879-1955)
      One must have a mind of winter
      To regard the frost and the boughs
      Of the pine-trees crusted with snow;
      And have been cold a long time
      To behold the junipers shagged with ice,
      The spruces rough in the distant glitter
      Of the January sun; and not to think
      Of any misery in the sound of the wind,
      In the sound of a few leaves,
      Which is the sound of the land
      Full of the same wind
      That is blowing in the same bare place
      For the listener, who listens in the snow,
      And, nothing himself, beholds
      Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.

    Sunday, January 14
    Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith: "Dr. King, the Leader"

    • Prelude: Sparrow by Wilbur Held
    • Candle Music : Come Sunday by Duke Ellington
      First Parish Jazz Ensemble and Caryn Sandrew
    • Offertory: Ubi caritas by Jeanne Demessieux
    • Anthem: I Wish I Knew How by B. Taylor and D. Dallas
      First Parish Jazz Ensemble
    • Postlude: Just a Closer Walk by Joe Utterback
    • Hymns & Readings: 151, 202, 577, excerpt from the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King's sermon The Drum-Major Instinct

    Saturday,, January 20, 6-9pm
    Fundraising Dance Event - Cajun & Zydeco music to support Youth service trip to New Orleans in February

    Sunday, January 21 Mozart service
    The music for this annual service celebrates Mozart's birthday on January 27.
    Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith: "Questions for a Minister"

    • Prelude: Adagio from Quartet in F by Wolfgang A. Mozart (1756-1791)
    • Candle Music: Ave verum corpus (1791) by Mozart
      accompanied by the First Parish Flute Loops
      Click here to practice this selection with the soprano emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the alto emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the tenor emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the bass emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with all parts played equally
    • Offertory: Laudate Dominum (Psalm 117) from Vesperae Solennes de Confessore, K. 339 (1781) by Mozart
      Nancy McDowell, soprano

      Notes - This work,from the Solemn Vespers, was Mozart's final composition for the Salzburg Cathedral in 1780, before his permanent departure from his hometown in search of greater artistic opportunities of Vienna. One of two settings Mozart made of this service, K.339 was intended for the special celebration of an undisclosed saint's day (the "confessor" of the title). As required by Mozart's conservative employer, Archbishop Colloredo, each Psalm is set as a continuous movement, as opposed to being divided into separate arias, ensembles, and choruses in the operatic style invading church music at that time. Except for this radiant soprano aria probably written for Mozart's future sister-in-law Aloysia Weber, the vocal solos also are treated in a more reserved ensemble style.

      Despite these restrictions, Mozart's music abounds in joyous exuberance. Every movement extols the praise and virtues of God, further emphasized by the doxology ("Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit…") which concludes each section. Clearly, here is a composer in full command of his fully matured artistic resources. Though less well known today than some other major works in the Mozart choral repertoire, the "Solemn Vespers" surely stands as one of the high points of his sacred output.

      Click here to practice this selection by individual part

    • Anthem: Priest's Chorus from Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute, K. 620, 1791) by Mozart
      Men of the First Parish Choir
    • Postlude: Within these sacred walls - In deisem heil'gen Hallen (Sarastro's aria) from Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute, K. 620, 1791) by Mozart
    • Hymns & Readings: 297, 322, 654

    Sunday, January 28
    Gini Courter, Moderator, UUA: "For Such a Time as This" [contrasting messages that make up UU beliefs]

    • Prelude: Wondrous Love by Ronald Perera
    • Intergenerational Music: Oh, Had I a Golden Thread (1958) by Pete 0er, arranged by Nick Page
      Chalice Singers and Chalice Sparks, conducted by Laura Prichard, with the Adult Choir, conducted by Jennifer Kobayashi
      Like many of Seeger's classic works, it is often mistaken for a folk/traditional song, but Pete Seeger himself wrote, "A rather gentle song came to me as I was fooling around on the guitar. Years later I realized that I had rewritten the melody of Nearer My God to Thee. Once again, you can see how the folk process has been aided by a bad memory." This song was his opening and closing music for Seeger's public television show, Rainbow Quest.
      Oh, had I a golden Thread
      And needle so fine
      I've weave a magic strand
      Of rainbow design, of rainbow design
      In it I'd weave the bravery
      Of women giving birth,
      In it I would weave the innocence
      Of children over all the earth, children of all earth.
      Show my brothers and sisters
      My rainbow design,
      Bind up this sorry world
      With hand and heart and mind, hand and heart and mind.
      Far over the waters I'd reach my magic band
      To every human being
      So they would understand, so they'd understand.
      Seeger on Banjo
    • Candle Music: Fire of the Spirit (2000) by Herbert Bielawa (Berkeley, California)
      Adult Choir and Chalice Singers
      Unitarian Universalist Herbert Bielawa studied composition at the University of Illinois and earned his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in composition at USC. At the Aspen School he worked with Darius Mihaud, Lukas Foss, and Elliott Carter. He was composer-in-residence for the Spring Branch School System in Houston under the Contemporary Music Project in the 1960s, where he wrote music for the ensembles of seven local high schools. He was a professor for twenty-five years at San Francisco State University where he founded the contemporary performing group Pro Musica Nova, created the electronic music studio, and developed courses for the computer music major. His most recent music commissions were from Meet the Composer, the American Guild of Organists and Earplay. Since 1991, he has been composer-in-residence for the Unitarian Universalist Church of Berkeley, California and founding director of Sounds New, a San Francisco Bay Area new music ensemble.
      Fire of the Spirit, life of the lives of creatures,
      spiral of sanctity, bond of all natures,
      glow of charity, lights of clarity,
      taste of sweetness to the fallen,
      be with us and hear us.
      Composer of all things, joy in the glory, strong honor,
      be with us and hear us.

      by Hildegard von Bingen (#493 in Hymnal)
    • Offertory: Credo by Margaret Vardell Sandresky
    • Anthem: Wanting Memoriesby Ysaye M. Barnwell (of Sweet Honey in the Rock)
      I am sitting here wanting memories to teach me,
      to see the beauty in the world through my own eyes.
      I thought that you were gone,
      but now I know you're with me;
      you are the voice that whispers all I need to hear.
      You used to rock me in the cradle of your arms,
      you said you'd hold me 'til the pains of life were gone.
      You said you'd comfort me in times like these
      and now I need you, and now I need you,
      and you are gone.
      Now the world outside is such a cold and bitter place,
      here inside I have few things that will console,
      And when I try to hear your voice above the storms of life
      then I remember all the things that I was told.
      I think on the things that made me feel so wonderful when I was young,
      the things that made me laugh, made me dance, made me sing.
      I think on the things that made me grow into a being full of pride;
      think on these things, for they are truth.
      I know a "please", a "thank you", and a smile will take me far;
      I know that I am you and you are me and we are one,
      I know that who I am is numbered in each grain of sand;
      I know that I've been blessed again and over again.
      Notes - Unitarian Universalist Ysaye M. Barnwell joined the all-female a cappella group Sweet Honey In The Rock in 1979. The concept and leadership of the group rest primarily with Bernice Johnson Reagon, who, as vocal director of the D.C. Black Repertory Theater, founded The Sweet Honey in 1973. Ysaye M. Barnwell (pronounced Eaze-eye) joined the group in 1979 and along with Reagon has become the group's main spokeswoman. Barnwell holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Speech Pathology and a Ph.D. in Public Health. She has worked on various projects as a composer (Sesame Street, the Dance Company of Pittsburgh, the Women's Philharmonic of San Francisco), has taught at Howard University, and has presented her workshop Singing In The African-American Tradition all around the world. This workshop in part-singing has been recorded, and can be borrowed from the First Parish Music Program.
    • Postlude: Sanctus by Margaret V. Sandresky
    • Hymns & Readings: 23, 128, 466, Because Nothing Looks Like God by Lawrence and Karen Kushner, excerpt from the Book of Esther
    • Youth & Music Field Trip to Museum of Science: 2pm showing of MacGillavray Freeman's Hurricane on the Bayou
      11 members of the Chalice Singers and Sparks & 30 students from the First Parish Youth programs (grades 8-12)

    Sunday, February 4
    Dr. Lori Kenschaft, Guest Speaker: "The Changing Meanings of Marriage"

    • Prelude: Salut d'Amour by Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934) in celebration of Elgar's 150th Birthday Year
    • Opening Hymn: #299, Chalice Singers and Chalice Sparks accompany on bells
    • Intergenerational Music: "Everything Possible" by Fred Small
      Diane Taraz Shriver
    • Candle Music: Winter Prayerby Fenno Follensbea Heath
      The Lord Came down on a snowy day.
      White, O, white He lay.
      In spring, the Lord walked all around.
      Stirred seed, spread sod o'er leaf and ground.
      Fell with the rain and rose again.
      Green root, green shoot, oh green he strode.
      So kneel I by thy branches in the snow.
      Let all my branches down and pray to know
      That from each bough so barren now
      A shoot of grace, a sprig of faith will grow.
      by Alexander Winston
    • Offertory: Do You Love Me? from The Fiddler on the Roof by Sheldon Harnick and Jerry Bock
      Caryn Sandrew and Alan Schweitzer, duet; Laura Prichard, piano
    • Postlude: Love Song by Alfred Newman
    • Hymns & Readings: 299, 300, 437, The Moose and the Cow by Fred Small
    • Music Field Trip to live taping of From the Top!: 2pm performance at Jordan Hall in Boston
      8 members of the Chalice Singers and Sparks

    Saturday, February 10 First Parish Mardi Gras Auction

    Sunday, February 11
    Rev. Marta Valentin, Minister, First UU Church of New Orleans: "Still Standing on Higher Ground, Year 2"
    Click here for her biography on the First Church New Orleans website
    Combined Service with Youth Groups from Arlington, North Andover, and Framingham

    • Prelude: Higher Ground - Traditional Baptist Hymn
      A Cappella Quartet: Krista Ernewein, Dorothy May, Jean Renard Ward, Michael Prichard
    • Candle Music: What a Wonderful World
    • Offertory Hymn: Over My Head (verses 1,2, and 4) with String/Jazz Band
    • Anthem: Zydeco Gris Gris with String/Jazz Band
    • Closing Anthem: Mardi Gras Mambo with String/Jazz Band
    • Hymns & Readings: 30, 361, Hey Mistah!, Why New Orleans Matters
    • Postlude/Second Line Procession: When the Saints Go Marchin' In
      Led by the Chalice Singers and Chalice Sparks

    Saturday, February 17-24
    Youth Group New Orleans Service Project

    Sunday, February 18
    Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith: "Lessons from Sudbury" (Fraters of the Wayside Inn Study Retreat, Sudbury)

    • Prelude: Prelude and Fugue in G minor by Dietrich Buxtehude
    • Offertory: Meditation by Charles M. Widor
    • Closing Song: Keep on the Sunny Side by A. P. Carter
      led by Diane Shriver, guitar
    • Postlude: Maestoso by J. C. H. Rinck
    • Hymns & Readings: 38, 42, 436

    Sunday, February 25
    Initial Interim Minister Rev. Patricia Brennan: "Questions for a Minister"

    • Prelude: Rhosymedre by Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • Candle Music: Snow, op. 26, no. 1 (1895) by Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934) in celebration of Elgar's 150th Birthday Year
      Lucy Caplan, William Henriksen, Loren Pearson, violins
      Women of the First Parish Choir
      Click hereto hear a live recording (Cal Tech Women's Glee Club)
      Text by Caroline Alice Elgar (1848-1920):
      O snow, which sinks so light,
      Brown earth is hid from sight
      O soul, be thou as white as snow,
      O snow, which falls so slow,
      Dear earth quite warm below;
      O heart, so keep thy glow
      Beneath the snow.
      O snow, in thy soft grave
      Sad flow'rs the winter brave;
      O heart, so sooth and save, as does the snow.
      The snow must melt, must go,
      Fast, fast as water flow.
      Not thus, my soul,
      O sow Thy gifts to fade like snow.
      O snow, thou'rt white no more,
      Thy sparkling too, is o'er;
      O soul, be as before,
      Was bright the snow.
      Then as the snow all pure,
      O heart be, but endure;
      Through all the years full sure,
      Not as the snow.
      Text by Alice Elgar
    • Offertory: Canzonetta by William Mathias
    • Anthem: Where E'er You Walk from Serse by George F. Handel
      Men of the First Parish Choir
    • Postlude: Jupiter's Theme by Gustav Holst
    • Hymns & Readings: 34, 131, 199, 654 Holst

    Saturday, March 3, 7:30pm
    Composing Strings' Concert featuring students of Elizabeth Knight

    Sunday, March 4

    Topic: "Building Up the Ruins" by the Rev. Ashlee Wiest-Laird, Pastor of First Baptist Church in Jamaica Plain
    with Rev. Tricia Brennan: "Our Neighbors, The Baptists"

    • Prelude: Andante Pastorale by Joseph Rheinberger
      Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Wendy Covell, organ
    • Candle Music: Tantum ergo, op. 10, no. 4 (1960) by Maurice Duruflé
      Click here to practice this selection with the soprano emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the alto emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the tenor emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the bass emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with all parts played equally
      Click here to hear a live recording (Christ Church Cathedral Choir w/ boys)
    • Offertory: Ubi caritas by Jeanne Demessieux
    • Anthem: Ubi caritas, op. 10, no. 1 (1960) by Maurice Duruflé
      Click here to practice this selection with the soprano emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the alto emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the tenor 1 emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the tenor 2 emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the bass 1 emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with the bass 2 emphasized
      Click here to practice this selection with all parts played equally
      Click here to hear a simply sung live recording (FVHS)
    • Postlude: Ein Feste Burg by Michael Praetorius
    • Hymns & Readings: 40, 140, 567

    Sunday, March 4
    First Parish Musicale at 2pm
    featuring Gilbert & Sullivan's Pirates of Penzance

    • Solo & chamber music performers: The UUlations, Dora Pereli, Annie Whitford, David Whitford, Drew Pereli, First Parish Flute Loops (Willemien Insinger, Ted Live, Mies Boet-Whitaker, Lisa Hesterkamp Davis, Alyson Schultz, Michael Prichard, Laura Prichard), Cheri Minton, Lorraine Cooley, Meg Candilore, William Henriksen, Carol Lewis, Olav Chris Henriksen, Rachel stark, Lean Cirker-Stark, B. Iris Tanner, Doug Hammer, Samantha Fleishman, Nancy McDowell
    • Soloists in Pirates: Sam Seiders, Robert, Patrick, Jennifer Kobayashi, Andy Kobayashi, Marianne Henriksen, Alana Thurston, Clara Friedman, Dorothy May, Andrew Leonard, John Hodges, Brad Amidon, Jean Renard Ward, Michael Prichard, Jonathan Markowitz Bijur
    • Orchestra for Pirates: Bob Olsen, Drew Pereli, Willemien Insinger, Ted Live, Mies Boet-Whitaker, Laura Prichard, Andrew Leonard, Jean Renard Ward, Alex Ptacek Zimmer, Wendy Page, Wendy Covell, and Michelle Markus, concertmistress

    Sunday, March 11
    Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith: "Together We Can: Reflect, Reconnect, Renew"

    • Prelude: St. Patrick's Breastplate by Jospeh Clokey
    • Offertory: Betörte Welt from Cantata No. 94, no. 4 (1724) by Johann S. Bach (1685-1750)
      Dorothy May, alto; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe, Wendy Covell, organ
      In his masterful 1972 book The Church Cantatas of J. S. Bach, musicologist Alec Robertson writes "This aria puts the unjust steward [described in the Gospel of Luke] in his place. The amazing part for the flute may well depict his ill-gained but attractive profits: but when the tempo changes to allegro, he is left to count his gains, whereas the Christian holds to Jesus as his wealth." Bach wrote two of his most masterful cantatas on this text: Betörte Welt! Auch dein Reichtum, Gut, und Geld ist Betrug und falscher Schein. [Deluded world! All your wealth, goods, and money are false, an empty shell.] Fenwick West, principal flautist for the Boston Symphony, writes, "Bach first wrote for the transverse flute in the 1720s, and demonstrated almost immediately an unparalleled understanding of its technical and expressive potential. Much of his greatest writing for solo wind instrument can be found in the cantatas and the B-minor Mass. The arias in these works nearly always include an instrumental obbligato that illustrates, comments upon, adorns, or engagaes in dialogue with the text.
      Betörte Welt! Auch dein Reichtum, Gut, und Geld ist Betrug und falscher Schein.
      Du magst den eitlen Mammon Ich will davor mir Jesum wählen;
      Jesus, Jesus, soll allein Meiner Seele Reichtum sein.

      Deluded world! / All your riches, goods and gold / are false; an empty shell.
      You may count your futile hoard, / but I shall choose instead my Jesus;
      Jesus, Jesus alone / shall be the wealth of my soul.

      Comment by Craig Smith (Emmanuel Church, Boston):  Bach almost always sets sin not as something ugly but something irresistibly and dazzlingly beautiful. In the period when Bach wrote this work there was in Leipzig a guest and evidently quite accomplished flutist. Certainly the series of arias and ensembles with flute written at this time are among the high points of the literature. The text for the alto aria with flute continues the self-flagellation of the previous verses, but the tone is softer and more forgiving. The eight lines of text are divided up irregularly. The first three comprise an extended slow section with poignant chromatic sequences in the flute. The next two lines are taken up with a tiny 7 bar allegro, over before you know it. Lines 6 and 7 are a kind of arioso resembling the beginning but not really a tempo. The last line is the faux da capo, using all of the opening material but very condensed. As with many of Bach's great, lesser-known works, the difficulty and ambiguity of this piece have kept it from being famous rather than any lack of musical quality. It also must be said that Cantata BWV 94 is an example of a work that can have devastating effect in a liturgical setting and makes virtually no musical sense in a concert.

    • Postlude: Molly on the Shore by Percy Grainger
      David Whitford, violin
    • Hymns & Readings: 323, 347, 502, When the Spirit Says Do
    • 3pm Arlington Philharmonic Chorale Concert at First Parish

    Sunday, March 18
    Affiliate Minister Rev. Caitlin O'Brien: "Eat, Play, Love" [restoring yourself through devoted attention to life]
    with Rev. Carlton Elliott Smith

    • Prelude: Legend by Louis Vierne
    • Opening Hymn: I Brought My Spirit to the Sea
      Chalice Singers accompanied on bells
    • Children's Choirs: Food, Glorious Food from Oliver!
    • Offertory: Marcietta by Theodore Dubois
    • Anthem: Cantique de Jean Racine, op. 11 by Gabriel Fauré
    • Postlude: Quasi Fantasia by Louis Vierne
    • Hymns & Readings: 4, 29, 546
    • Organ Show following the service (11:45-12:30pm), Wendy Covell, organ

    Sunday, March 25
    Worship Leaders from the "Rebuild New Orleans" Krewe & the Rev. Tricia Brennan: "Love in Action"
    Stories and Reflections from the recent New Orleans Service Project

    • Prelude: The Chrysanthemum by Scott Joplin (1867-1917)
    • Candle Music: Come, Sing a Song with Me by Carolyn McDade, arr. by Krista Ernewein
    • Offertory: Original Piano Composition by Eva Leah Cirker-Stark
    • Anthems: New Orleans Eyes by Jean Coletta Hodges
      Amen (traditional Gospel song) led by Krista Ernewein
    • Closing Song : Down in the River to Pray (traditional folk hymn)
    • Hymns & Readings: 567, I Am a UU

    Sunday, April 1
    Topic: Music Service - Waging Peace through Song

    • Prelude: Fools Medley
      UUphonics, led by Andrew Leonard
      Avi Fagan, piano
    • Candle Music: Letter from Home by Pat Metheny
      Avi Fagan, piano
    • Offertory: Agnus Dei & Beat! Beat! Drums! from Dona nobis pacem by Ralph Vaughan Williams
      Diane Shriver, soprano
      Michelle Markus, clarinet; Peter Pulsifer, trumpet; Robert Olsen, bass; Alex Zimmer, timpani
    • Anthem: The Angel of Death & O Man, Greatly Beloved, Fear Not from Dona nobis pacem
      Chris Jones, tenor; Michael Prichard, baritone; Laurie Francis-Wright, soprano
      Michelle Markus, clarinet; Peter Pulsifer, trumpet; Robert Olsen, bass; Alex Zimmer, timpani; Avi Fagan, concert bells
      Click here to listen to this selection by individual part
    • Postlude: Gregory Flynn, organist
    • Hymns & Readings: 271, 290, 577, Vine and Fig Tree

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    Sunday, April 8
    Topic: Easter

    • Prelude: Symphony No. 6, I. Allegro by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
      First Parish Intergenerational Orchestra
    • Opening Hymn: Chalice Singers and Chalice Sparks accompany on bells
    • Candle Music: Rise Up, My Love (1929) by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

      Click here for a biography of the composer. Rise up my love, my fair one, and come away. For lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone; The flowers appear on the earth, the time of the singing of birds is come. Songs of Songs 2: 10-12

    • Anthem: Alleluia from Ben Hur (1959) by Miklós Rózsa (April 18, 1907-1995) in celebration of Rózsa's 100th Birthday
    • Offertory: Gaudeamus pariter by David Lansky
    • Bread & Juice Communion: Alleluia (1940) by Randall Thompson (1899-1984)
    • Postlude: Now the Green Blade Riseth
      Chalice Singers accompanying themselves on bells
    • Hymns & Readings: 4, 29, 269, 270, 545, 726, 727

    Sunday, April 15
    Rev. Patricia Brennan "Why Forgive?"

    • Prelude: Chorale Prelude on "Adon Olam" by Isadore Freed
    • Candle Music: Bogoroditsye Dyevo (Hymn to the Mother of God) by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943)
      Click here to practice this movement of the Vespers by individual part
    • Offertory: Minuetto from Sonata in D Minor by Giacomo Cervetto
      Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Corinne Boet-Whitaker, cello
      Mi shebeirach avoteinu (The one who has blessed our fathers)
      M 'kor habracha l'imoteinu.
      (Source of blessing for our mothers.)
      May the source of strength who blessed the ones before us,
      Help us find the courage to make our lives a blessing, and let us say, Amen.
      Mi shebeirach imoteinu (The one who has blessed our mothers)
      M 'kor habracha l'avoteinu. (Source of the blessing for our fathers)
      Bless those in need of healing with r'fuah sh'leimah. (complete healing)
      The renewal of body, the renewal of spirit, and let us say, Amen.
    • Anthem: - Congregation: Mi Shebeirach by Debbie Friedman
      Jewish tradition ordains that whenever the Torah is read we are granted a special and uniquely opportune moment to invoke blessing for those in need of divine intervention. From time immemorial it has therefore been the custom to recite a Mi Shebeirach (prayer for the sick) on behalf of people who are ill.
    • Postlude: Gavotta Allegro from Sonata in D Minor by Giacomo Cervetto
    • Hymns & Readings: 21, 42, 572, "The Wolves Within," "On Your Way"

    Thursday, April 19 All Soul's Unitarian Church, Manhattan, 7pm
    Rev. Cheryl M. Walker on Commitment to Caring for the Earth and for Ourselves
    First Parish Teen Music Group Enrichment/Service Trip

    • Hymns for All Souls at Midweek: Spirit of Life, The Blue Boat Home, For the Earth Forever Turning, Woyaya, The Fire of Commitment
    • Eran Asias, drums; Dan Chernosky, guitar; Assaf Hakimi, bass; Phillip Palmer, piano/leader; Sara Shumway, voice
    • First Parish Teen Music Group: Natalie Duranceau, Clara Friedman, Dora Pereli, Drew Pereli, Alana Thurston, Annie Whitford, Alex Zimmer
    • Chaperones/Other Students: Avi Fagan, Holly Herring, Coletta Hodges, Laura Prichard, Mike Prichard, Bonnie Zimmer

    Sunday, April 22 Alliance Sunday with music coordinated by Cheri Minton
    "Field Notes: My UU Window on Capitol Hill" Meredith Schonfeld-Hicks, UUWF Clara Barton Intern for Women's Field Issues, with the Rev. Tricia Brennan

    • Prelude: Sicilienne by Maria Theresia von Paradis
      Wendy Covell, organ
    • Candle Music: Building Bridges (Contemporary English Quaker round with text by the women of the Greenham Common peace occupation in England, 1983)
      When Will the Fighting Cease? with words by Nick Page and Nita Penfold to music of Melchoir Franck (c1579-1639)
      Intergenerational Women's Choir
      (for music, see http://firstparish.info/Music/AllianceSundayMusic.html)
      Dona nobis pacem (traditional round in three parts)
    • Offertory: Agnus Dei by Margaret Vardell Sandresky
    • Anthem: Riddle of the Stars by Diane Taraz Shriver (member of First Parish Arlington)
      Intergenerational Women's Choir, directed by Cheri Minton
      The stars are dancing in the sky;
      they seem so small as they drift by,
      But they're not really small at all, just try to catch 'em when they fall.
      The stars seem new, so clean and bright, as if they're born fresh every night,
      But stars are old, as old can be, older than eyes can ever see.
      Stars are so very far away that all the light we see today
      was made so very long ago; it's just an ancient afterglow.
      The stars may always seem the same, all burning with eternal flame,
      But stars are born, grow old, and die; it just takes longer til they fly.
      So many riddles in a star; it's just amazing what they are.
      No matter how much more we know, it only makes our wonder grow.
    • Postlude: Built on a Rock by Christina Harmon
    • Hymns & Readings: 131, 318, Blessing the World by Rebecca Parker

    Sunday, April 29
    Rev. Carlton E. Smith "The Journey through Hopelessness to Hope"

    • Prelude: When in the Hour of Utmost Need by Johann S. Bach (1685-1750)
    • Candle Music: For the Flowers are Great Blessings and For I am under the Same Accusation from Rejoice in the Lamb by Benjamin Britten
    • Offertory: A Mighty Fortress by Johann S. Bach (1685-1750)
    • Anthem: For the Instruments are By Their Rhymes from Rejoice in the Lamb by Benjamin Britten
    • Postlude: Agnus Dei by Johann S. Bach (1685-1750)
    • Hymns & Readings: 17, 123, 331, 470, Life Doesn't Frighten Me by Maya Angelou, excerpt from Healing Through the Dark Emotions: The Wisdom of Grief, Fear and Despair by Miriam Greenspan

    Sunday, May 6
    Membership Sunday

    • Prelude: Trumpet Tune by Harald Rohlig
    • Candle Music: Ce moys de May by Clement Janequin (c1485-1558)
      Click here to see the score for this selection
      Click here to hear the parts played for this selection
      Click here to hear a live recording of this selection
    • Offertory: Dialog by Daniel Pinkham
    • Anthem: Revecy venir du printans by Claude le Jeune (1528-1600)
      Click here to hear a live recording of this selection
    • Postlude: Avec Tendresse by Rolande Falcinelli
    • Hymns and Readings: 295, 358, 474
    • Final Spring Children's Choirs Field Trip to MIT Gilbert & Sullivan Society's Princess Ida
    • Spring Cantilena Women's Chorus Concert, 7pm
      Kenneth Seitz, Music Director

    Sunday, May 13
    Topic: Shinn Service - Social Justice annual focus & Mother's Day
    "As the World Warms" Kevin Knobloch, President of the Union for Concerned Scientists

    • Prelude: A Bird Call by Jean-Philippe Rameau
    • Choral Call to Worship: Rise Up, My Love (1929) by Healey Willan (1880-1968)
      Chalice Singers and Adult Choir

      Click here for a biography of the composer.
      Rise up my love, my fair one, and come away.
      For lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone;
      The flowers appear on the earth, the time of the singing of birds is come.

      Songs of Songs 2: 10-12

    • Intergenerational Song (led by Teen Music Group): Blue Boat Home, from the new UU Singing the Journey hymnal
      Though below me I feel no motion
      Standing on these mountains and plains
      Far away from the rolling ocean
      Still my dry land heart can say
      I've been sailing all my life now
      Never harbor nor port have I known
      The wide universe is the ocean I travel
      And the Earth is my blue boat home.

      Sun, my sail and moon, my rudder
      As I ply the starry sea
      Leaning over the edge in wonder
      Casting questions into the deep
      Drifting here with my ship's companions
      All we kindred pilgrim souls
      Making our way by the lights of the heavens
      In our beautiful blue boat home.

      I give thanks to the waves upholding me
      Hail the great winds urging me on
      Greet the infinite sea before me
      Sing the sky my sailor's song
      I was born upon the fathoms
      Never harbor or port have I known
      The wide universe is the ocean I travel
      And the Earth is my blue boat home.
    • Offertory: Magnificat (Canticle of Mary) by Arvo Pärt (1935-)
      Chris Jones, conductor; Diane Taraz Shriver, soprano solo
    • Postlude: How Firm a Foundation by Jean Langlais
    • Hymns & Readings: 163, 203, 550, "A Hopi Elder Speaks" (attributed to an elder of the Hopi Nation in Oraibi, Arizona)

    Saturday, May 19
    UU Mitzvah for the Ptacek-Zimmer Family

    • Prelude: What a Wonderful World by Thiele & Weiss
    • Congregational Singing: Mi Shbeirach by Debbie Friedman, 347, 368, 512
    • Postlude: All Blues by Miles Davis

    Sunday, May 20
    Topic: Celebrating Leadership by the REv. Tricia Brennan, Sonja Boet-Whitaker, Rachel Botos, Nicola Cuoco

    • Prelude: Tempo di Marcia by William Billings
    • Intergenerational Music: (led by Teen Music Group) Standing on the Side of Love by Jason Shelton, from the new UU Singing the Journey hymnal
    • Candle Music: (led by Teen Music Group) Fire of Commitment by Jason Shelton, from the new UU Singing the Journey hymnal
      From the light of days remembered burns a beacon bright and clear,
      Guiding hands and hearts and spirits into faith set free from fear.
      When the fire of commitment sets our mind and soul ablaze,
      When our hunger and our passion meet to call us on our way,
      When we live with deep assurance of the flame that burns within,
      Then our promise finds fulfillment and our future can begin.
      —words by Mary Katherine Morn and Jason Shelton
    • Offertory: Epilogue by Norman Gilbert
    • Anthem: Seasons of Love from Rent by Jonathan Larson (1960-1996)
      Teen Music Group & Adult Choir; Alex Ptacek Zimmer, drums
    • Recessional to Memorial Garden: Siyahamba (South African song in Zulu) from the new UU Singing the Journey hymnal
    • Hymns & Readings: 34, 203, 325, 447, We Are not Alone, read by Sam Scribner, Benediction given by Eli Schultz

    Sunday, May 27 Chamber Music
    "Holy Remembrance" - Rev. Tricia Brennan

    • Prelude: Prelude by Johann Sebastian Bach
      Steve Carmody, soloist
    • Candle Music: Gymnopédie No. 1 (1888) by Erik Satie (1866-1925)
      Liza Kitchell, piano
      Notes on the Candle Music - One of Erik Satie's (1866-1925) most beautiful and haunting works, the three Gymnopédies, marks his transition from Conservatory student to cabaret composer. Satie lived in the Montmartre district of Paris, and was both a trained organist and a cabaret pianist. He composed for diverse groups including the Rosicrucian Order, Le Chat Noire (a Montmartre cabaret), Diaghilev's Ballets Russes, and the Parisian Dadaists. Told repeated as a student that he was not meant to be a composer, he persevered and became one of the main influeneces on the composers Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel.
    • Offertory: Sous Le Ciel de Paris (Under Paris Skies) composed by Hubert Giraud (1920-)
      David Whitford, violin; Liza Kitchell, piano
      Notes on the Offertory - Sous Le Ciel de Paris (Under Paris Skies) is a beautiful cabaret song by Jean Drejac and Hubert Giraud from the 1951 French film of the same title. The English lyrics by Kim Gannon warn of the dangers of love and celebrate spring: ("Stranger beware/ There's love in the air/ Under Paris skies... Love becomes king/ The moment it's spring... Watch what you do/ The same thing can happen to you."). Giraud made his name as a jazz harmonica player with Django Reinhardt at the Hot Club of Paris in the 1930s. He later took up the guitar and played throughout South America and Parisian nightclub orchestras. He began his career as one of the great popular song composers in the 1950s, and his songs have been famously interpreted by Edith Piaf, Jacqueline Francois, Yves Montand, Edith Sparrow, and Andy Williams. Sous le Ciel de Paris was even arranged for orchestra by Lalo Shifrin for the 1998 "Concert of a Century" recording by the Three Tenors (Domingo, Pavarotti, and Carreras).
    • Hymns: accompanied by Liza Kitchell

    Sunday, May 27 Martha's Vineyard SERVICE TRIP
    Sunday Service at UU Fellowship of Martha's Vineyard: The Vinyard Nailers
    Thirty members of the First Parish Music Program, including most of the choir, traveled to Martha's Vineyard last weekend for their annual Service Trip. They organized and participated in a Benefit Concert in the Historic Whaling Church in Edgartown, MA which raised over $3,000 for student musicians in New Orleans. Diane Taraz Shriver appeared as a featured singer/songwriter, the UUlations performed a full set, led by Jennfier Kobayashi, and other vocal soloists from First Parish included Dorothy May, Nancy McDowell, Mike Prichard, Jennifer Kobayashi, and Andy Kobayashi. Our group also attended the Sunday morning service of the U.U. Society of Vineyard Haven, where the choir sang two selections and the Flute Loops performed Mozart's "Ave verum corpus." Instrumentalists on the trip included Alex Ptacek Zimmer, Ted Live, Alyson Schultz, Alan Schweitzer, Lorraine Cooley, the Kobayashis, the Prichards, and Mies Boet-Whitaker.

    • Instrumental Prelude: Ave verum corpus by Wolfgang A. Mozart
      First Parish Flute Loops Sextet, directed by Mies Boet-Whitaker
    • Choral Prelude: Down in the River to Pray from the Coen Brothers' film O Brother, Where Art Thou?
      First Parish Choir
    • Musical Interlude: Ubi caritas, op. 10, no. 1 (1960) by Maurice Duruflé
      First Parish Choir

    Sunday Benefit Concert at the historic Whaling Church, Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard
    Concert for a Cause: Supporting New Orleans' Student Musicians

    • Sing on This Festive Day Jacques Arcadelt, arr. Patrick M. Liebergen
      'Till There Was You from The Music Man Meredith Willson, arr. Kirby Shaw
      Tranquility Diane Taraz
      Over the Rainbow from The Wizard of Oz Harold Arlen/E. Y. Harburg, arr. Jeff Klitz
      First Parish UUlations (Arlington, MA), directed by Jennifer Kobayashi
    • What a Wonderful World George David Weiss & Bob Thiele
      Shall We Gather at the River/Deep River John Carter (1929-1991)
      Glenn Carpenter, soloist
      Soon and Very Soon Andraé Crouch (1942-), arr. Jack Schrader
      Vintage Voices of Martha's Vineyard, directed by Phillip Dietterich
    • Ol' Man River from Showboat Jerome Kern (1885-1945)
      Michael Prichard, baritone; Laura Prichard and Lorraine Cooley, piano
      Betörte Welt from Cantata No. 94, no. 4 Johann S. Bach (1685-1750)
      Dorothy May, alto; Mies Boet-Whitaker, flute; Philip Dietterich, organ
      Vocal Chamber Music
    • Rise Up, My Love Healey Willan (1880-1968)
      Ce Moys de May Clément Janequin (c1485-1558)
      The Lone, Wild Bird Thomas Somerville (1940-)
      The Blue Bird Charles V. Stanford (1852–1924)
      You are the New Day John David (1946-), arr. Peter Knight
      First Parish UU Choir (Arlington, MA), directed by Laura Stanfield Prichard
    • The Grey Funnel Line Cyril Tawney
      The Sea-Serpent of Cape Ann, Raisin Pie, and Shoes That Fit Like Sand by Diane Taraz
      Diane Taraz, singer/songwriter
    • O Freedom & Free at Last
      Live a Humble
      Don't You Let Nobody Turn You 'Round Kate Taylor, soloist
      NAACP Spirituals Choir, directed by Jim Thomas
    • Audience Singalong – When the Saints Go Marching In
      (verses 4-7 by Louis Armstrong)
      1. When the Saints go marching in… 5. When the air is pure and clean…
      2. When the sun begins to shine… 6. When we all have food to eat…
      3. When the trumpet sounds its call… 7. When our leaders learn to cry…
      4. When the rich go out and work… 8. When the Saints go marching in…
    • Danny Boy (text by Frederick Wetherby) Joseph Flummerfelt, arr. (1936-)
      Think on Me Lady John (Alicia Ann) Scott (1810-1900)
      Wesley Brown, piano Greg Gilpin, arr.
      Island Community Chorus, directed by Peter Boak
    • Audience Singalong – Battle Hymn of the Republic
    • Laudate Dominum from Vesperae, K. 339 (1781) Wolfgang A. Mozart (1756-1791)
      Nancy Annis McDowell, soprano; Mies Boet-Whitaker, Ted Live, Alyson Schultz, flutes
      That Lonesome Road James Taylor, arr. Simon Carrington
      Followers of the Lamb (Shaker hymn) Philip R. Dietterich (1931-)
      Andy Kobayashi, baritone solo
      If We Only Have Love Jacques Brel (1929-1978)
      Combined Choirs

    Sunday, June 3
    Carlton E. Smith "Building from Compassion" & Hymn Contest Winner Announced

    • Prelude: Generations by Dennis McCarthy
    • Hymn Contest Winner Announced: Sacred Space by Raphael Scarfullery
      Text by Diane Taraz Shriver
    • Candle Music: The Lone, Wild Bird by Thomas Somerville
      Carl Schlaikjer, oboe
      Notes: Thomas Somerville's delicate setting of "The Lone, Wild Bird" uses the solo flute to represent the radiance of a soaring bird (or a spirit) in lofty flight. Dr. Somerville is Emeritus Faculty at Occidental College and former conductor of the Oxy choral ensembles. He is Artistic Director and Conductor of the Los Angeles Bach Festival, Director of Music at the First Congregational Church of Los Angeles, and Associate Teacher of the Master Class in Conducting at the Oregon Bach Festival.
    • Offertory: Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott from Cantata No. 129 by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
      Dorothy May alto; Carl Schlaikjer, oboe; Wendy Covell, organ
      Notes: Composed for the Feast of the Trinity in 1727, Bach's Cantata No. 129, "Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott" (Praise the Lord, my God, BWV 129) sets a five-verse chorale text by Johannes Olearius from 1665, and each movement is based on a cantus firmus taken from the chorale. The cantata's fourth movement is the third aria (unusually, the cantata has no recitatives), a G-major pastorale in 6/8 time for alto soloist, oboe d'amore, and organ continuo.
      Text & translation: Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott, der ewig lebet, den alles lobet, was in allen Lüften schwebet;
      Praised be the Lord my God, who lives forever, whom all things praise that soar in the breezes;
      Gelobet sei der Herr, des Name heilig heißt, Gott Vater, Gott der Sohn und Gott der Heil'ge Geist.

      Praised be the Lord my God, who name is called Holy, God the father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit.
    • Musical Interlude: The Road Not Taken from Frostiana (1958) by Randall Thompson
      Krista Ernewein, voice; Wendy Covell, piano
      Notes: In 1958, Randall Thompson was commissioned to compose a piece celebrating the 200th anniversary of the incorporation of the town of Amherst, Massachusetts. The townspeople suggested that Thompson set a poem by Robert Frost, the quintessential New England poet who had lived for a time in Amherst. Thompson, a friend of Frost's, agreed but rejected the town's choice of poem, The Gift Outright. Instead, he chose to compose a suite of seven poems, and titled it Frostiana. Thompson subtitled the suite Seven Country Songs, and the poems he selected certainly provide a nostalgic glimpse of rural New England life. A common thread unites the poems, emphasizing the importance of the many small choices we are called to make throughout life. Through his sensitive settings of Frost's texts, Thompson gently counsels us to take the road less traveled, and the composer himself conducted the premiere at the Bicentennial Commemoration on October 18, 1959. Robert Frost attended, and was so delighted that at the conclusion of the performance, he rose to his feet and shouted, "Sing that again!"
    • Postlude: Gigue Fugue by Dietrich Buxtehude
    • Hymns & Readings: Spirit of Life (a cappella), Sacred Space, On Your Way

    Saturday, June 9, 1pm
    Memorial Service for Michael Tennis

    • Prelude: Stanley Sagov, MD, piano
    • First Parish Anthem: That Lonesome Road by James Taylor, arranged by Simon Carrington for The King's Singers
    • Candle Music: Rainbow Connection performed by Nick Page Louise Grasmere
    • Mystic Chorale Anthem: Every Day is a Day of Thanksgiving by Leonard Gregory Burke
    • Closing Music: A Promise I Will Keep by Nita Penfold and Nick Page

    Sunday, June 10
    Topic: Flower Communion

    • Prelude: Allegro non troppo by William Mathias (1934-1992)
      Notes: Welsh composer William Mathias composed more than a dozen full-length works for organ, including an Organ Concerto that was the hit of the 1984 BBC Promenade Concerts. A Fellow and graduate of the Royal Academy of Music, he received a Dmus from the University of Wales and taught in the Music Department at the University College of North Wales, Bangor from 1959 to 1988. A house composer with Oxford University Press, he was known as a conductor and pianist, and gave many premieres of his own works.
    • Offertory: Romanza by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
      Vaughan Williams based his Two Organ Preludes of 1956 on Welsh folk songs. The first, entitled Romanza, is based on the traditional melody entitled "The White Rock."
    • Arch of Love Music: [recording chosen by Youth Group]
    • Flower Communion (Placing of Flowers): The Oak and the Ash (Yorkshire folk song) arranged by Edward Bairstow (1874-1946)
      Notes: The Oak and the Ash is a well-known British folk tune from the Yorkshire (North Country) region, with the refrain "Oh the oak and the ash and the bonnie ivy tree, they flourish at home in my own country." It was first published four hundred years ago (1607) in John Hawkins' Transcripts of Music for the Virginals [keyboards] and the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book under the title "Quodling's Delight." This was Rudyard Kipling's favorite folksong, and he refers to it in his poem A Tree Song:
      Of all the trees that grow so fair,
      Old England to adorn,
      Greater is none beneath the sun,
      Than Oak, and Ash, and Thorn.
      Sing Oak, and Ash, and Thorn, good sirs,
      (All of a Midsummer morn!)
      Surely we sing of no little thing,
      In Oak, and Ash, and Thorn! […]

      Oh, do not tell the priest our plight,
      Or he would call it a sin;
      But--we have been out in the woods all night,
      A-conjuring Summer in!
      And we bring you good news by word of mouth --
      Good news for cattle and corn --
      Now is the Sun come up from the south,
      With Oak, and Ash, and Thorn

      Sing Oak, and Ash, and Thorn, good sirs
      (All of a Midsummer morn)!
      England shall bide till Judgment Tide,
      By Oak, and Ash, and Thorn!

      Some versions of the lyrics substitute "bonny Rowan tree," and "ivy" may refer to a yew tree. The song has spawned a springtime adage about the order of budding: "If oak before the ash we are in for a splash, ash before the oak, we are in for a soak."
    • Anthem: Ego flos campi by Clemens non Papa (1510-1556)
      Ego flos campi et lilium convallium.
      (Bride:) I am the flower of the field and the lily of the valleys.
      Sicut lilium inter spinas sic amica mea inter filias.
      (Bridegroom:) As the lily among thorns, so is my love among the daughters.
      Fons hortorum et puteus aquarum viventium quae fluunt impetu de Libano.
      The fountain of gardens: a well of living waters, which run with a strong stream from Lebanon.
      Click here to hear a recording by Amici Cantores
      Notes: Ego flos campi is one of many beautiful works by the Franco-Flemish Renaissance composer Jacobus Clemens (1510-1556). A prolific composer in many styles and languages, he was most well-known for his polyphonic settings of all 150 Psalms in Dutch known as the Souterliedekens. In his thirties, Clemens worked at the Bruges Cathedral and became the choirmaster at the court of Charles V. His nickname Clemens non Papa was jokingly added by the Parisian publisher Pierre Attaingnant to distinguish him from the contemporaneous Pope Clement VII (Jacobus Clemens, but not the Pope). Clemens adopted the name, as it reflected Protestant sympathies on his part, and he was one of very few northern European composers to never visit Italy. He also lived in the university town of Leiden, and wrote a wide variety of music in the Northern style (15 masses, 233 motets, 80 chansons, and 159 Souterliedekens).
      The Latin text is taken from the biblical Song of Songs (2:1-2, 4:15), and uses metaphors to describe the purity, simplicity, and stability of the church. Our choir has sung other Song of Songs settings this Spring (Willan's Rise Up My Love), but this one is unique due to its combination of flower and water symbolism.
    • Postlude: Serenade (1965) by Derek Bourgeois (1941-)
    • Hymns & Readings: 76, 305 (verses 1E and 1S), 724, Hymn of Promise

    Sunday, June 17
    Band Appreciation Day
    Rev. Tricia Brennan, "Gratitude as a Way of Life"

    • Prelude: Gymnopédie III (1888) by Erik Satie (1866-1925), transcribed in 1960 for band by Alfred Reed, after the orchestration by Claude Debussy
      First Parish Symphonic Band, featuring the Flutes
    • Candle Music: Gymnopédie I (1888) by Erik Satie (1866-1925), trans. Alfred Reed, orch. Claude Debussy
      First Parish Symphonic Band, featuring the Flutes
    • Offertory: Dublin Bay [Lisbon] (Sailor's Song), based on the singing of Mr. Deane of Hibbaldstowe, Lincolnshire, England, in 1905, arr. for band in Lincolnshire Posy (1937) by Percy Aldridge Grainger (1881-1961)
      Click here for a biography of Percy Grainger.
      Click here for a detailed description of the movements of Lincolnshire Posy.
      Click here for Grainger's detailed comments on the work.
      Notes: "As a young boy in Australia, Percy was given a section of the family garden to cultivate. He promptly discarded the flower and vegetable seeds his parents had given him and instead collected as many different weeds and wildflowers as he could find. When asked about his strange taste in horticulture, he replied, 'What's the difference? I think the weeds are just as pretty as the other flowers.' His 1905-06 folksong collection from Lincolnshire, England, represented his own musical wildflowers and weeds and hence the title, Lincolnshire Posy--'dedicated to the singers who sang so sweetly to me'."--James Westbrook.
    • Anthem: Horkstow Grange (The Miser and his Man), based on the singing of George Gouldthrope (Goxhill, Lincolnshire) in 1905, from Lincolnshire Posy by Grainger
      Click here to hear the Williams College Symphonic Winds play the Horkstow Grange movement.
    • Postlude: Liberty Bell March by John Philip Sousa (1854-1932)
    • Hymns & Readings: 65 and 128 accompanied by Band, 479

    Sunday, July 1
    "The Art of Communication" led by Carolyn Stevens
    An Overview of Self-Help Communication Movements and a Glimpse of the Method of Compassionate Communication developed by Marshall Rosenberg, with testimonies from Glenn Koenig and Esther Kingston-Mann

    • Vocal Prelude: Ave regina caelorum (trio) by Guillaume Dufay (1400-1474)
      Jean Renard Ward, Mike Prichard, Laura Stanfield Prichard
    • Instrumental Prelude: Prelude No. 1 in C Major from the Well-Tempered Clavier (1724) by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
      Laura Stanfield Prichard, piano
    • Candle Music: Serenade (1818) by Franz Schubert (1797-1828)
      Jean Renard Ward and Laura Stanfield Prichard, piano duet
    • Offertory: Ewige Freude (vocal trio) by Franz Schubert (1797-1828)
      Jean Renard Ward, Mike Prichard, Laura Stanfield Prichard
    • Postlude: We Are a Gentle, Angry People (Hymn #170)
      Led by Michael Prichard
    • Hymns & Readings: 358, 360, 420, 602, excerpt from Lucy Leu's Nonviolent Communication Companion Workbook (2003, p. 172)

    Sunday, July 8, 2007
    "Our Varied Hymns and Favorite Hymns" - forty-four ballots were cast in 2006 by parishioners to determine our current favorite hymns (indicated here with number of votes for each). This service was coordinated by Jim Hall and accompanied by Jim Austin on piano.

    • #38 (22 votes), 121 (20), 108 (17), 123 (17), 16 (17), 368 (14), 305 (13), 298 (13), 205 (12), 21 (12) Honorable Mention:159 (9) & 318 (6); 349 (8) & 67 (4)
      • Prelude: Favorite Hymn Overture (2006) by Jim Austin
      • Offertory: Turn Back (music from the Genevan Psalter) (2007) by Jim Austin
      • Benediction: From All Who Dwell Below the Skies by Isaac Watts, led by Laura Stanfield Prichard
      • Postlude: Finlandia (1899) by Jean Sibelius, adapted as Hymns #159 & 318; 349 & 67

      Sunday, July 15, 2007
      "The Church of Our Dreams"
      This service was coordinated by Steve Carmody, Emma Whitford, and Rebecca Benefiel Bijur.

      • Prelude: May Nothing Evil Cross this Door (Hymn #1)
        Alan Schweitzer, guitar
      • Offertory: May I Suggest by Susan Werner
        Alan Schweitzer, guitar
      • Candle Music, & Postlude: Piano Improvisations played by Jim Austin
      • Hymns & Readings: 118, 121, There's a River Flowing in my Soul, excerpt from The Orange Splot

      Sunday, July 22, 2007
      "Grace – How Amazing!"
      This service was coordinated by Rev. Ronald Hersom, James Hall, and Carolyn Hodges.

      • Offertory: Amazing Grace played by Jim Austin
      • Prelude, Candle Music, & Postlude: Piano Improvisations played by Jim Austin
      • Hymns & Readings: 21, 151, 318, 417, 649

      Sunday, July 29, 2007
      "Creating Positive Visions for Change"
      This service was coordinated by Jonathan Markowitz Bijur and Rebecca Benefiel Bijur.

      • Offertory: Music played by Steve Carmody
      • Hymns & Readings: 36, 128, 287, Responsive reading Kindness Leads by Ronald A. Hersom, based on words by Lao Tsu

      Sunday, August 5, 2007
      "Modern Lessons in Classical Myths"
      This service was coordinated by Krista Ernewein and Rebecca Benefiel Bijur.

      • Prelude: Dúlamán (children's song about Irish seaweed) by Máiread Ní Mhaonaigh (of Altan)
      • Candle Music: Breatnaigh Abú by Maire Breatnach (her clan march)
      • Offertory: Song for Ireland by Mary Black
      • Hymns & Readings: 123

      Sunday, September 2, 2007
      "Encounters with the Qur'an"
      This service was coordinated by Lori Kenschaft and Carolyn Stevens.

      • Offertory: The Adhan (Call to Prayer)
      • Hymns & Readings: 21, 26, 123, 440, Sura No. 1 (The Opening)

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